Local News

Wednesday, Sep 25 2013 06:57 AM

'First Look': First News for Sept. 25

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By THE BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIAN

Lead stories from "First Look with Scott Cox's" Big 6:

DOCTOR COMES TO THE RESCUE: A local doctor is being hailed as a hero after he used a folding pocket knife and pen to perform an emergency tracheotomy on a former Kern County supervisor at a downtown Bakersfield restaurant. The Bakersfield Californian reports it all happened Monday night at The Mark where top officials had gathered after leaving the symposium on valley fever held in Bakersfield on Monday and Tuesday. Pauline Larwood, who was Kern County's first female supervisor and currently serves as a community college trustee, was eating dinner with some of the doctors and others in town for the symposium when she began choking. After the Heimlich maneuver failed, Dr. Royce Johnson, Kern Medical Center's chief of infectious diseases, used a friend's knife to make an incision in Larwood's throat to allow the insertion of a pen as a breathing tube. The procedure succeeded and Larwood was rushed to Mercy Hospital Downtown. Her son said by Tuesday that she was doing fine. Read the full story here.

KERN MEDICAL CENTER CUTS: Kern County supervisors make some deep cuts to make up for a massive budget shortfall. The Board of Supervisors approved cuts Tuesday to make up for a $19.5 million shortfall at Kern Medical Center. Supervisors learned earlier this month that over the past several years, financial managers at KMC had dramatically overestimated -- to the tune of an estimated $64 million -- how much they could expect to be reimbursed by state and federal programs that pay for Medi-Cal patients and the uninsured. The $19.5 million is this year's share of that financial deficit. In future years, county officials will have to account for the rest of the 64 million dollar problem. The cuts made Tuesday mean Sheriff Donny Youngblood will hold 13 vacant positions open to cover the $1.54 million share of the burden his office will carry. KMC CEO Paul Hensler lost his job over the financial mess. Read the full story here.

MORE JOBS FOR PRISON WORKERS: More prisoners are coming to Kern County, and that means more jobs. As officials try to ease overcrowding by the November deadline, the McFarland Community Correctional Facility has signed a five-year agreement with the state and a private contractor to house hundreds of inmates. They'll start arriving as early as next month, so an estimated 145 correctional and administrative officers are being hired immediately. County supervisors agreed Tuesday to a contract that will send about 500 long term, nonviolent felons to the Taft Community Correctional Facility. The $75-million, five-year agreement with the facility will allow Los Angeles county to free up beds in L.A. County jails so that other inmates will serve a greater portion of their sentences. Read the full stories here and here.

LAKESIDE UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT: A local school district decides to issue bonds to make up for its debt. The Lakeside Union School District had 10.1 million dollars in debt coming due on June 1, 2014 and no way to pay it. But after weeks of cooperation between taxpayers and officials, the board voted unanimously Tuesday night issue controversial bonds in order to refinance the debt. Although the vote means the district is essentially borrowing more money and that property taxes in the southwest Bakersfield district will rise, it was seen as a win-win decision. Farmers and dairymen had been working with the board to brainstorm strategies for reducing the amount the district would need to borrow. Agricultural interests will bear the bulk of the tax burden. Read the full story here.

HIGH SCHOOL LOSES ITS RATINGS : A high school in Delano loses its rating on the academic performance index after a teacher is caught with banned material. 23-ABC's Erin Briscoe says the LA Times broke the story Tuesday about 27 schools statewide that lost their ratings for similar violations. A district spokesman says the teacher at Cesar E. Chavez High School didn't realize that doing that was a violation and had no intention of cheating. The teacher, whose name was not released, has been placed on paid administrative leave and self-reported the violation as a matter of integrity. Read the full story here.

CAUSE OF DEATH: Autopsy results are out for a man who died after an incident at a Lamont group home. On July 9 around 4:45 p.m., 27-year-old Joseph Lynch reportedly assaulted a staff member at the home on Hinsley Street. Lynch was restrained and died about an hour later at Kern Medical Center. On Tuesday, the Kern County Coroner said the cause of death was suffocation, and it's listed as a homicide meaning it was at the hands of another person. No arrests have been made. Read the full story here.

WHAT'S TRENDING ON BAKERSFIELD.COM

In case you missed it, here are the stories that are trending across bakersfield.com.

DRAMATIC DINNER RESCUE INVOLVED KNIFE, UCLA DOCTOR AND CDC CHIEF: A local doctor is being hailed as a hero after he used a folding pocket knife and pen to perform an emergency tracheotomy on a former Kern County supervisor at The Mark restaurant Monday night. Pauline Larwood, who was Kern County's first female supervisor and currently serves as a community college trustee, was eating dinner with some of the doctors in town for the symposium when she began choking. After the Heimlich maneuver failed to open Larwood's airway Dr. Royce Johnson, professor of medicine at UCLA and Kern Medical Center's chief of infectious diseases, used a friend's knife to make an incision in Larwood's throat to allow the insertion of the hollow cylinder of a pen as a breathing tube. The procedure succeeded and Larwood was rushed to Mercy Hospital Downtown. By Tuesday, her son said, she was doing fine. Read the full story here.

SEVERAL CITED FOR ALCOHOL VIOLATIONS AT KERN COUNTY FAIR: Authorities cited four minors in possession of alcohol and three people who provided alcohol to minors Friday during an undercover operation at the Kern County Fair. Read the full story here.

THIRTEEN-YEAR SENTENCE FOR DRUNKEN DRIVER WHO INJURED THREE: A convicted drunken driver who injured three people in a 2011 crash was sentenced to 13 years in prison Tuesday. April Crystal Trujillo, 25, was convicted April 26 of two felony counts of DUI causing bodily injury. Bakersfield police said reports filed in court that Trujillo's blood alcohol content was .26 -- more than three times the legal limit -- when she ran a red light the night of April 23, 2011 at Gosford Road and White Lane and hit another car. The collision left one victim in a coma for nearly two months and inflicted major injuries on two others. Read the full story here.

LAKESIDE BOND PASSES UNANIMOUSLY: Until Tuesday night's board meeting, the Lakeside Union School District had $10.1 million in debt coming due on June 1, 2014 and no way to pay it. But after weeks of cooperation between taxpayers and officials, the board voted unanimously to issue controversial bonds in order to refinance the debt. The capital appreciation bond that the district voted for, is a long-term, very high interest bond that has led to exorbitant debt obligations across the state. Read the full story here.

GROUP HOME RESIDENT'S DEATH A HOMICIDE: A resident of a Lamont group home who died in July was found to have suffocated and his death is a homicide, the coroner's office said Tuesday. Kern County Sheriff's detectives have been investigating the death of 27-year-old Joseph Adam Lynch, but the status of the case Tuesday was unclear. Deputies were dispatched to the home in the 3000 block of Hinsley Street on July 9 for a report of vandalism. Lynch had been in an argument and punched a staff member in the face, and was then restrained by two or three other staff members and a resident. Deputies said they found Lynch unresponsive when they arrived at the home and they began CPR. He was pronounced dead at Kern Medical Center about an hour later. Read the full story here.

 

THE TECH REPORT

AUTOFILL: Facebook is launching a new payments tool enabling consumers to make purchases within mobile applications using their Facebook login information. Autofill with Facebook enables any shopper who has previously provided the social networking giant with credit card account information to complete purchases across partnering mobile apps without re-entering their billing data. The new app is similar to PayPal.

TV: CBS is now Twitter's biggest partner in the TV biz, with the companies announcing a pact to sell sponsored video-based tweets for 42 CBS shows as well as many of its Internet properties this fall. The partnership will cover 24 CBS brands, including CBS.com, CBSSports.com and CBSSports.com, and TVGuide.com. The Twitter Amplify program lets media companies place sponsored tweets with embedded video clips. Twitter is doubling down efforts to generate revenue from TV networks, ahead of its initial public offering in the next few months. Other Amplify partners include ESPN, Viacom, Fox, BBC America, and Major League Baseball.

 

THE HEALTH REPORT

HIV: The number of HIV infections and Aids-related deaths has fallen dramatically, according to a UN report. Death rates fell from 2.3 million during its peak in 2005 to 1.6 million last year. Among children, the drop was even steeper. In 2001 there were more than half a million new infections. By 2012 the figure had halved to just over a quarter of a million. The study's authors put the fall in deaths and infection rates in children down to better access to antiretroviral drugs which help suppress the virus.

SATISFRIES: In a move destined to shake up the fast-food industry, Burger King yesterday unveiled a simple but startling innovation: french fries with 30 percent less fat and 20 percent fewer calories than their current fries. They've dubbed the new product Satisfries. They won't replace B-K's classic fries, but will be sold in addition to them. The new crinkle-cut fries have 40 percent less fat and 30 percent fewer calories than McDonald's fries. The move comes at a time consumers are increasingly demanding healthier options. The low-cal, low-fat fries will cost 20 cents to 30 cents more per serving -- except in Kids Meals, where there will be no price difference. Satisfries are available now in all Burger Kings in North America.

 

THE SPORTS REPORT

BC DROPS TO NO. 25 IN STATE JC FOOTBALL POLL: Bakersfield College's football team has dropped to No. 25 this week in the state rankings announced by the California Community College Athletic Association. The Renegades lost their second straight game Saturday, 45-23 to No. 4 Fullerton. BC was No. 15 in the previous week's poll. BC fell from No. 9 to No. 15 in the Southern California poll. The Renegades play host to Ventura (2-1) in the National Northern Conference opener for both teams Saturday at 7 p.m. Ventura is ranked No. 12 in the state and No. 6 in Southern California. Read the full story here.

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