Local News

Tuesday, Sep 24 2013 07:29 AM

'First Look': First News for Sept. 24

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By THE BAKERSFIELD CALIFORNIAN

Lead stories from "First Look with Scott Cox's" Big 6:

VALLEY FEVER: Valley Fever is getting some big-time attention in Bakersfield. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health will launch a randomized controlled trial to get a better understanding of how to treat valley fever. The endeavour, announced on Day 1 of a two-day valley fever symposium held here in Bakersfield, will cost millions of dollars and involve roughly 1,000 patients. The trial could help determine the best practices for treating the fungal infection. The event is sponsored by congressman Kevin McCarthy of Bakersfield and features the heads of the Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health. Day 2 happens today at the Cal State Bakersfield Multi-Purpose Room in the Student Union. Read the full story here.

ABORTION: The Bakersfield City Council takes up the issue of abortion. People on both sides of a controversial resolution came out Monday to see how it would be handled by the council's Legislative and Litigation Committee. 23-ABC's Larissa Wohl reports the resolution praises groups that want to get the word out about alternatives to abortion. And the committee did approve the unenforceable resolution which will be now heard by the full council. However the ordinance has been tabled. Tim Palmquist, one of Bakersfield's most active abortion opponents, said he'd like an ordinance but could live with a resolution. Others believe public officials should steer clear of the issue. Read the full story here.

GARCES HIGH SCHOOL: A local high school football program under scrutiny for possible rules violations isn't out of the woods yet. Eight weeks after Rams coach Jim Maples was suspended, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Fresno soon is expected to release results of an investigation into possible recruiting violations within the Garces program. If they uncover violations those results could lead to self-imposed sanctions or punishment from the section ranging from a letter of reprimand to a postseason ban. If the section isn't satisfied with the results or the scope of the Diocese investigation, it could launch its own probe. Maples was suspended July 29 and reinstated Aug. 6 after a Diocese investigation determined that allegations against Maples could not be substantiated. The Diocese said it could not release details related to the probe because of privacy concerns, so whether Maples' suspension was related to recruiting is unknown. The Diocese's current investigation is additional to the one that cleared Maples. Read the full story here.

TEHACHAPI POLICE GRANT: Tehachapi will be getting a few more cops, thanks to a state grant. It's one of 39 cities and counties get federal funding under a program to hire 105 officers this year statewide. Tehachapi will get 125 grand over three years to bring on a second School Resource Officer, in a partnership with the local district. The new officer would work at the city's three elementary schools, allowing the other to spend more time policing the middle schools and high schools.

SOCIAL SECURITY: A Bakersfield woman pleads guilty to misusing a social security number to get disability benefits. Princesa Mata, 66, pleaded guilty Monday to one count of misuse of a Social Security number. Mata admitted that she used another person's name, date of birth and Social Security number to apply for and receive Social Security disability benefits. She received $93,000 in Social Security funds between July 2000 and November 2009 through using the other person's identify. Mata is scheduled to be sentenced Dec. 16 and faces a maximum five years in prison. Read the full story here.

CHILD PORNOGRAPHY: A Tennessee man pleads guilty to receiving child pornography while living in Kern County. Christopher Kirk, 36, of Big Sandy, Tenn., pleaded guilty Monday to receiving child pornography while he was living in Kern County in 2006. Kirk admitted to knowingly receiving more than 600 images of child pornography. He's scheduled to be sentenced Dec. 16 to nine years in prison. Read the full story here.

WHAT'S TRENDING ON BAKERSFIELD.COM

In case you missed it, here are the stories that are trending across bakersfield.com.

RADIO HOST PLEADS NO CONTEST TO DRUNK AND DISORDERLY CONDUCT: Longtime local talk radio host Inga Barks has pleaded no contest to misdemeanor drunk and disorderly conduct and is scheduled to be sentenced March 20. Barks, who hosts a show weekdays on KNZR AM 1560, entered the plea Friday in connection with her Feb. 27 arrest at The Marketplace shopping center. Bakersfield police said they'd received reports of an unconscious woman, and found Barks displaying signs of intoxication. She was uncooperative when officers asked for identification, and was arrested on suspicion of public intoxication. Barks said in a March email to The Californian that she had experienced "an adverse reaction to meds." Read the full story here.

VALLEY FEVER CLINICAL TRIAL ANNOUNCED AT SYMPOSIUM: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health will launch a randomized controlled trial to get a better understanding of how to treat valley fever, officials announced in Bakersfield Monday. The endeavour, announced on Day 1 of a two-day valley fever symposium, will cost millions of dollars and involve roughly 1,000 patients. The trial could help determine the best practices for treating the fungal infection. Read the full story here.

TEACHER ARRAIGNED ON CHARGES RELATED TO FOURTH DUI ARREST: Local teacher and repeat drunken driver Brandi Lynn Sherman was ordered held on $55,000 bail after being arraigned on two felony charges and a misdemeanor Monday afternoon. Judge Colette M. Humphrey warned her she could be charged with murder if she drives under the influence and someone is killed as a result. She signed paperwork saying she understood the admonition. The 38-year-old is charged with DUI with three or more convictions within 10 years, DUI with an enhancement and driving with a license that was suspended or revoked because of a drunken driving conviction. Read the full story here.

CITY COMMITTEE APPROVES ANTI-ABORTION RESOLUTION: A Bakersfield City Council committee approved an anti-abortion resolution on Monday affirming that "there are many positive and feasible alternatives to abortion." To take effect, the resolution must be approved by a council majority and could come before the full council on Oct. 16. However, the resolution approved Monday is a step back from an earlier, more restrictive proposal. Nevertheless, its approval marked a victory for anti-abortion activists. Read the full story here.

TWO TEENS MISSING: Two teens have been missing since Friday morning and are considered at risk because of their age. Police are asking for the public's help finding 14-year-old Arika Galaviz and 13-year-old Israel Mondragon. Galaviz was last seen at 7:45 a.m. at Hughes Lane and Pacheco Road, and Mondragon was last seen at 7:30 a.m. leaving his residence to go to school. Galaviz is described as Hispanic, 5 feet 2 inches tall, 120 pounds, with black hair and brown eyes. Mondragon is described as 5 feet 4 inches tall, 220 pounds, with brown hair and haze eyes. Anyone with information is asked to call the BPD at 327-7111. Read the full story here.

 

THE TECH REPORT

GMAIL: A bug bit Gmail Monday and almost half of the webmail service's users experienced email delivery delays and problems downloading attachments. Google first acknowledged the problem shortly before 7:30 a.m. In an update posted at around 11 a.m., the company disclosed that "less than 50 percent" of users had been impacted. Gmail has more than 425 million active users. The problem was remedied by 1 p.m.

TECH JOBS: Private investment in U.S. wireless broadband infrastructure promises to catalyze economic growth and employment over the next five years, according to a new report from Information Age Economics. They evaluate the economic and job-creation impacts generated by projected wireless infrastructure investments between $34 billion to $36 billion per year over the next five years. On the employment front, wireless investments will yield more than 28,000 new jobs in 2017 and more than 122,000 jobs during the next five years, the report said.

 

THE HEALTH REPORT

NAPS: Naps don't just provide children with much-needed rest: They may aid in learning too. New research shows that children who had a midday nap performed better on memory recall tests than those who weren't able to get any extra snooze time. Preschoolers started playing a memory game at 10 a.m. and stopped when they were able to accurately remember where 75 percent of the images were located. After the game, the kids were divided into the groups. Kids in the first group were encouraged to nap and slept about 77 minutes. The second group did not nap at all. Kids who took a nap were able to remember about 75 percent of the items once they woke up and got tested again. However, those who did not nap only remembered about 65 percent of them. The study authors hope they can convince more schools to require nap time.

UNIVERSAL FLU VACCINE: Scientists say they have made a significant leap towards creating a vaccine that would protect against every form of flu. The influenza virus is a constantly shifting target so seasonal flu vaccines rapidly become useless and new ones are needed each year. A team at Imperial College London say they have made a "blueprint" for a universal flu vaccine. The material on the inside is common to many strains of flu. Vaccine researchers believe targeting the core of the virus may be the way to develop a universal vaccine.

 

THE SPORTS REPORT

GARCES UNDER INVESTIAGTION FOR POSSIBLE RECRUITING VIOLATIONS: The troubles for Garces' football program might not be finished. Eight weeks after Rams coach Jim Maples was suspended, Central Section commissioner Jim Crichlow said Monday that the Roman Catholic Diocese of Fresno soon is expected to release results of an investigation into possible recruiting violations within the Garces program.Those results, if they uncover violations, could lead to self-imposed sanctions or punishment from the section ranging from a letter of reprimand to a postseason ban. Read the full story here.

 

CHECK OUT OUR SCOTT IN 60 FEATURE:

 

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