Local News

Monday, Jan 27 2014 04:53 PM

PHOTO GALLERY: State of the Union addresses through the years

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    By AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

    As seen from the Rose Garden, President Barack Obama works at his desk in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, ahead of Tuesday night's State of the Union speech.

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    By AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

    The Capitol is seen from the Russell Senate Office Building as Congress resumes work in Washington, Monday, Jan. 27, 2014. President Barack Obama will deliver his State of the Union address Tuesday night to a joint session of Congress.

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    By AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

    Capitol Police Officers are seen on patrol at the Capitol Building in Washington, Monday, Jan. 27, 2014, as preparation are made for Tuesday's State of the Union address. On Tuesday, President Barack Obama will give his State of the Union address, an annual rite of official Washington that for one night squeezes the three branches of government underneath the same roof for the speech.

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    By AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File-Pool

    In this Jan. 25, 2011 file-pool photo, President Barack Obama delivers his State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Is "strong" losing its strength? Presidents of both parties have long felt compelled to sum up the state of the union with a descriptive word or two in their State of the Union addresses. Mostly the same word. For many years now, "strong" has been the go-to adjective. Vice President Joe Biden is at left, House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio is at right.

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    By AP Photo/Win McNamee, File-Pool

    In this Jan. 19, 1999 file-pool photo, President Bill Clinton gestures while giving his State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Is "strong" losing its strength? Presidents of both parties have long felt compelled to sum up the state of the union with a descriptive word or two in their State of the Union addresses. Mostly the same word. For many years now, "strong" has been the go-to adjective. Vice President Gore, left, and House Speaker Dennis Hastert of Ill. listen.

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    By AP Photo, File

    This Jan. 11, 1962 file photo shows President John F. Kennedy giving his State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Is "strong" losing its strength? Presidents of both parties have long felt compelled to sum up the state of the union with a descriptive word or two in their State of the Union addresses. Mostly the same word. For many years now, "strong" has been the go-to adjective.

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    By AP Photo, File

    In this Jan. 1974 file photo shows President Richard Nixon giving his State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Is "strong" losing its strength? Presidents of both parties have long felt compelled to sum up the state of the union with a descriptive word or two in their State of the Union addresses. Mostly the same word. For many years now, "strong" has been the go-to adjective. Gerald Ford listens at left.

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    By AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File

    In this Jan. 28, 2008 file photo, President George W. Bush delivers his State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Is "strong" losing its strength? Presidents of both parties have long felt compelled to sum up the state of the union with a descriptive word or two in their State of the Union addresses. Mostly the same word. For many years now, "strong" has been the go-to adjective. Vice President Dick Cheney, left, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of Calif. listen.

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    By AP Photo, File

    In this Jan. 19, 1978 file photo, President Jimmy Carter gestures as he delivers his State of the Union Address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Is "strong" losing its strength? Presidents of both parties have long felt compelled to sum up the state of the union with a descriptive word or two in their State of the Union addresses. Mostly the same word. For many years now, "strong" has been the go-to adjective. Vice President Walter Mondale is seated left, House Speaker Thomas P. O'Neill of Mass. is at right.

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    By AP Photo, File

    This Jan. 7, 1943 file photo shows President Franklin D. Roosevelt giving his State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Is "strong" losing its strength? Presidents of both parties have long felt compelled to sum up the state of the union with a descriptive word or two in their State of the Union addresses. Mostly the same word. For many years now, "strong" has been the go-to adjective.

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    By AP Photo/Bob Daugherty, File

    This Jan. 25, 1983 file photo shows President Ronald Reagan receiving applause prior to making his State of the Union Address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Is "strong" losing its strength? Presidents of both parties have long felt compelled to sum up the state of the union with a descriptive word or two in their State of the Union addresses. Mostly the same word. For many years now, "strong" has been the go-to adjective. Vice President George Bush is at left, House Speaker of the House Thomas P. O'Neill Jr. of Mass. is at right.

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    By AP Photo, File

    This Jan. 12, 1966 file photo shows President Lyndon Baines Johnson giving his State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Is "strong" losing its strength? Presidents of both parties have long felt compelled to sum up the state of the union with a descriptive word or two in their State of the Union addresses. Mostly the same word. For many years now, "strong" has been the go-to adjective. House Speaker John McCormack of Mass. is at left, Sen. Carl Hayden, D-Ariz. is at right.

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    By AP Photo/Byron Rollins, File

    This Jan. 8, 1951 file photo shows President Harry S Truman giving his State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington. Is "strong" losing its strength? Presidents of both parties have long felt compelled to sum up the state of the union with a descriptive word or two in their State of the Union addresses. Mostly the same word. For many years now, "strong" has been the go-to adjective.

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By The Bakersfield Californian

On the eve of President Barack Obama's State of the Union address on Tuesday, we take a look at previous speeches.

The Associated Press notes that many presidents have used a descriptive word or two to sum up their addresses. And that word is often "strong."

The AP shares these images of presidents on both sides of the aisle who've used the word "strong."

 

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