Local News

Wednesday, Mar 28 2012 08:52 PM

March for Trayvon draws crowd

  1. 1 of 5

    By Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

    Ten-year-old Terrance Gilmore becomes teary eyed as he listens to speeches from people marching in downtown Bakersfield and demanding justice for Trayvon Martin, a 17-year-old boy who was shot and killed by George Zimmerman in Florida. Zimmerman claims self-defense but many are questioning whether Zimmerman acted in self-defense. Martin was wearing a hoodie and most people in the march wore a hoodie.

    click to expand click to collapse
  2. 2 of 5

    By Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

    Rosalind Woods-Sapp, holding a sign that reads, "could have been my son," speaks to people who marched to bring attention to the Trayvon Martin case in Florida. Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by George Zimmerman, who claims the shooting was in self-defense. Many in the march in downtown Bakersfield Wednesday wore hoodies to show solidarity with Martin, who was wearing a hoodie at the time of the shooting.

    click to expand click to collapse
  3. 3 of 5

    By Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

    Fourteen-year-old Whitney Rios, holding sign, leads between 100 and 150 people in a march down Chester Avenue in downtown Bakersfield to bring attention to the Trayvon Martin case in Florida. Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by George Zimmerman, who claims the shooting was in self-defense. Many in the march Wednesday wore hoodies to show solidarity with Martin, who was wearing a hoodie at the time of the shooting.

    click to expand click to collapse
  4. 4 of 5

    By Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

    Ten-year-old Terrance Gilmore, front, joins others in a moment of silence at the end of a march and rally to bring attention to the Trayvon Martin case in Florida. Martin was shot and killed by George Zimmerman, who claims the shooting was in self-defense.

    click to expand click to collapse
  5. 5 of 5

    By Henry A. Barrios / The Californian

    Moemo Gentry, foreground, and others wear hoodies during a march in downtown Bakersfield to show solidarity with Trayvon Martin, who was shot and killed in Florida by George Zimmerman, who claims the shooting was in self-defense.

    click to expand click to collapse
BY RACHEL COOK Californian staff writer rcook@bakersfield.com

Bearing Skittles and wearing hoodies, more than 100 people gathered outside Bakersfield City Hall Wednesday calling for justice for Trayvon Martin.

For 14-year-old Whitney Rios, who led the march from the GET Bus downtown transit center to city hall, justice means incarceration for George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer who shot Martin during a confrontation with the teen. Details of what exactly happened are still emerging; Zimmerman told police he acted in self-defense.

The Florida teen's death and the lack of charges against Zimmerman last month triggered a wave of outrage. Rios planned the march in less than a week with help from her sister to show support for Martin's family and give an outlet to the local response.

"It's just nice to see everybody come out as a community and come together and take a stand for something we all believe in," Rios said. "I believe one day, if it's not today, tomorrow, next month Trayvon Martin, he will get justice."

The crowd chanted, "We are Trayvon" and "No justice, no peace," as they marched. Gathering on the corner of Chester and Truxtun avenues, people took turns with a megaphone calling Martin's death a tragedy and asking the crowd to stand together against injustice.

Ryan Bell said the issue goes beyond black and white to "wrong and right," and said Florida's "Stand Your Ground" law is wrong.

"We're here talking about justice. This is more than color," Bell said.

Others told the crowd to remain vigilant about local issues as well and register to vote so they have power. Rios' sister Jaime Dock declared, "If I wanna rock my hoodie." and the crowd answered with a loud "I can."

Rosalind Woods was glad there was a local event to express support for Martin's family. She said she didn't have words to describe how sad she felt when she heard of Martin's death. She thought of her own 11-year-old son and the pain Martin's mother must feel.

"After everything (with the case) is done, her son is still gone," Woods said. During the march, Woods held a sign decorated with glitter and hearts that read, "Could have been my son."

Have something to share? Comment on this story
Today's Daily Deal
from
Bakersfield.com
$5
Daily Deal Image
Cafe Crepes De Paris
$10 worth of food for only $5 at Cafe Crepes De Paris
  • Value
    $10
  • Savings
    $5
  • Bought
    49
Buy Now